#EduGovRev

Now that the Ministerial engagement events have drawn to a close (with the final session in Dunoon yesterday, December 5th), it’s worth thinking about both the formal text of the current Education Governance Review, as well as the messages and tone from the Deputy First Minister, John Swinney, and Scottish Government officials at the events.

The Engagement events have shown that the intent of the Review is to encourage real reflection on the principles and practices of the Scottish education system. However, the heavy going language of the Review document does present somewhat of a barrier to those stakeholders for whom changes will be most felt – children and young people. In the series of events – a catch up of which can be found through twitter’s #edgovrev – conversations about practitioner’s experience of Scottish education are indeed full and broad. There seems to be a general agreement that the education system does well in serving a lot of learners, but for those whom barriers exist it is not nearly good enough. If we can cut through the formality of the Review consultation questions, we really can get to the nub of the changes we need to make. At the Edinburgh session I recently attended, the focus needed was identified as being on the child’s experience of school and learning, from 3 to 18.

Excellence and equity matter – but we need to engage children, young people and communities in what these concepts mean to them. So when we think of excellence and equity, we need to ask questions like:

Why do some children struggle at school?
What would an excellent school be like?
What would a school be like if everyone had the same opportunities – and no-one was left behind?

On the Pupil Inclusion Network site there are links to various bits of information about the Education Governance Review – http://pinscotland.org/theme-education-review.html. Yes, there are 17 formal questions asked, but you don’t need to answer them all! And in those questions, there are issues that children, young people, parents and carers need to express their views on.


Colin Morrison
PINS Co-ordinator

Education Governance Review

The Education Governance Review is about how education is run in Scotland.

If you are working with children and young people in any capacity, you can have your say as part of the Review. You can also help others to take part and give their views; including children and young people, parents and carers.

The Review is interested in some big issues and challenges and there are a number of questions posed by the Review. You don’t have to have an opinion on them all, but many are of huge importance to the children, young people, families and communities that PINS Members work with. Questions like:

  • What services and support should be delivered by schools?
  • How can children, parents, communities, employers, colleges, universities and others play a stronger role in school life? What actions should be taken to support this?
  • How can the governance arrangements support more community-led early learning and childcare provision?
  • How can effective collaboration amongst teachers and practitioners be further encouraged and incentivised?
  • How could the accountability arrangements for education be improved?

Visit the PINS Education Review page to find out more about how you can have your say:
http://www.pinscotland.org/theme-education-review.html